Artist Reception: April 4, 2019 (6-9pm) **Every First Thursday of Every Month** Artist Submission

Shane Townley’s NYA Art Center: A Bold Vision Realized in Manhattan

NYA Gallery Opens in the Heart of Tribeca

On March 7, 2019, Shane Townley and his team open the doors to NYA Gallery / newyorkart.com at 7 Franklin Place, a multi-use arts center and residency program in the heart of Tribeca’s burgeoning art scene.  

Coinciding with the opening day of The Armory Show, NYA Gallery welcomes artists, collectors, and patrons to experience this exciting new space. 

‘Tribeca is attracting a thriving arts community,’ says Townley. ‘We’re in the company of some of the most innovative galleries on one of Manhattan’s few privately owned streets––perfect for discrete VIP access and delivery of over-sized artworks.’

NYA Gallery Opening, Group Exhibition, and Reception:  Thursday, March 7, 6–9 PM at 7 Franklin Place  NYA Gallery encompasses 9,000 square feet of space on three floors designed for optimum artistic production, collaboration, and exhibition. 

The new location includes 1,000 square feet of exhibition space on the ground level, 22 individual studios, and a state-of-the-art 1,500-square-foot fine art storage facility in partnership with Frames and Stretchers; the leading experts in framing, installation, and shipping.  

‘Our regular exhibition program will feature established and emerging artists,’ says Townley, ‘and our monthly open studio tours led by gallery guides are a great way to showcase artists within the Townley Arts Foundation residency program, in partnership with generous support from the Eileen Kaminsky Family Foundation.’

Press Contacts:

Shane Townley, NYA Gallery Director

917-856-7624 | info@newyorkart.com

Cathy Condon, NYA Gallery Studio & Residency Director

646-961-1796 | info@newyorkart.com

Information about our residency program or inquiries about representation:

www.newyorkart.com

Cathy Condon, Studio & Residency Director

646-961-1796

(image: Eric Roux Fontaine (left), Shane Townley (right) ; standing in Bertrand Delicroix’s Axelle gallery, Soho, New York 2015)